Tag Archives: Tom

Must eat more carrots!

Brandy Slab/Rosemergy Towers

Flash Back – Severe 4a – Second
Monkey Puzzle – VS 5a – Lead
Monkey’s Lunch – Severe 4a – Lead

OK, two weeks in a row we’ve had long days. This one ending in a solo of the top part of Rosemergy Ridge in the dark in an effort to escape the claws of the viscous brambles. We had problems right at the start finding our way down to Brandy’s Slab. Probably should have read the guidebook instead of setting off on the first faint trail we found which lead in roughly the right direction.

Jelly Baby feast to start the day off

Back at the beginning of the day we had arrived at Rosemergy Towers, me with a view to having another go at Hard Times (which I fell off on the final move having gone too far left). However my still not recovered shoulder made a few protests on Flash Back (a good lead by Dave on what is an understated climb at Severe) so I gave this up as a bad idea.

Tom on the upper moves of Flash Back

And so we set our sights on Brandy’s Slab. Of course even though Tom had been there, we had no idea where to go, which resulted in an hour of bramble and Gorse bashing and a very zig zag route down. We had picked Piers up on the way and so a very scratched team arrived at the slab. I was to be honest a bit disappointed. I’d expected more, but the harder routes were just very bold and the easier routes not that inspiring. That said, I enjoyed the climbing, although I tend to agree with a comment on UKC that the detached flake of rock on Monkey Puzzle is just waiting for an opportune time to fall off. Hopefully, not with anyone climbing on it.

Lost in the Brambles

Monkey Puzzle is either a straight forward VS if you go slightly higher before moving into the narrow crack or a very bold VS if you go early. The nicer line is to follow the corner a bit further and then move across. Other wise you’re relying on friction on a very hairy and mossy face. Still it was fun despite the pain of setting up a belay with no anchor points… or at least not obvious ones.

Piers on Monkeys Lunch and having fun πŸ™‚

And so we set off heading out via Rosemergy Ridge, which soon turned into slightly more than a scramble in the dimming light. To give Piers his due, he did brilliantly considering he has only come back to climbing recently.

There were some distinctly nervy mantles and padding going on. Still we’re alive, so that counts as a grade A adventure in my books.

Slaying old memories

Pen Olver

Bilsons Fowl Play – V Diff – Lead

Let Her Children Play – VS 4b – Lead

So we welcomed a new member of the team in Piers who joined us for the first time. About time we had some new stock, as a few are getting a bit long in the tooth and broken.

I had in mind a bit of exploration on the far tip of the Lizard at Green Lane Cliff. This sits below the Coast Guard hut and seemed to have a few climbs in the V Diff to HVS range. As it turned out the area was a bit disappointing, but to be fair the weather meant it was seeping a lot and we definitely didn’t see it in its best condition. So its wait until its drier and onto Pen Olver to re-visit a few old acquaintances.

Initial exploration of Green Lane Cliff

One of the most tense parts of climbing at PO is the down climb. It all slopes away and feels a bit exposed, so for Piers it was an eye opener. But the climbing is great and the two we picked were classics. Bilsons Fowl Play is a solid V Diff into a steep corner, but LHCP is a different beast altogether. It has a number of sections; a mantleshelf into the initial crack, a very steep ( almost overhanging flake crack section. An exposed traverse and a final technical ramp. Combined it makes for an excellent route. Pro’s not bad but hard to place sometimes and the holds in general are solid and big.

Looking down Bilsons Foul Play

More importantly, Pen Olver can make a grey day like this was a fantastic outing. That and climbing with mates of course. Dave and Tom finished off their route on the main slab in the dark, so it was a walk out as night set, feeling weary but content.

Slightly dark as we left

Its a shame we missed the porpoises that the Coastguard lady told us about. Otherwise it would have been even better πŸ™‚

Elemental

14th December 2018

Cornish weather guarantees that your never guaranteed you’ll get to climb. Despite no real prediction of rain, the dark grey clouds and strong wind felt a real portend ofΒ  nastier things to come. Days like this tend to drive people for the cover of their warm homes and it would be easy to right it off and bail.

The other side of the squeeze

But then we would have missed out on a fun days scrambling around Pordenack. Just enough difficulty to add a bit of spice, but not terrifyingly exposed. We’d initially traversed onto the Green Face ledge (a nice little pulse raiser as its all a bit off kilter), but the cold, drizzle and wind meant ‘Mexican Pete’ was not going to be on. So we dropped into the Hidden Amphitheatre which proved equally as moist.

The scramble out

For those who havnt experienced the ‘squeeze’ its well worth it. A cleft through the rocks with jammed boulders, which empties into a hidden area and is the usual descent point for Pordenack. So to leave we exited vertically straight up the spires and landward face. You get an amazing view back across the point and all the thundering drama of Lands End comes into view. On this day, the 10’+ swell just made it spectacular.

Tom, hiding behind me.

Highlight of the day- eating lunch while watching a couple of seals bobbing out in the sea. In the end, a good way to spend a crap day.

The Seal Sanctuary

4th December 2018

Sennen

Protein – VS 5a – Lead

Now Dave has defined the ‘Seal’ move. When approaching an overhanging ledge deploy the ‘Seal’ mantelshelf technique… This involves working your way into an impossible situation where your feet cut loose and the only escape is to Seal flop around until you can get a knee (or any other part of your body) into a position where you can crawl exhausted onto the ledge. This should be done in the least graceful way you can and accompanied with shouts of “For F#*ks sake!” or “I CANT MOVE!!!” Finish it off with a ‘whoop’ as an expression of how relieved you are that you didn’t fall off and die.

Good steep climbing on Protein – Sennen

So with varying degrees of skill we (Tom, Dave and I) all practised this hard to perfect move on Protein, a stiff VS at Sennen. It didn’t help that it was the coldest day of the year so far, but to be honest this should have been in our range whatever the conditions. Protein starts with moves up into a V Groove where you transition right onto the ‘arete’ of sorts. Nice moves which then lead you to a second transition which goes left. Leaving the small ledge for the Chicken Head is the crux. Small crimps and pinches on what is an overhanging wall require some commitment and (as we all did) the move left helps you get height to make the hold. Might be one to do when my grip has improved, but the move left is no pushover so is in keeping with the VS grade.

Approaching the Seal Sanctuary on Protein

Then two more overhanging walls, the lower of which is really tricky. Hence the deployment of Dave’s patented moves which proved useful if inelegant. The top moves are fairly exposed and the holds though big, don’t feel as positive as they might. So all in all a great climb that gives you a bit of a test. I really liked it, even if it is a little contrived. More importantly it was great to be back at Sennen. We only got the one climb in because the rain was pushing in, but the Cornish coast delivered its usual drama with massive waves thundering into the Hayloft area.

A burly finish to Protein

To be able to just grab a mornings climbing in such an awesome location defines why living in Cornwall is the best. The weather may be varied, but you can keep your wall to wall sunshine… give me the North Coast in December any time.

What do you mean he’s not damaged!!?

2nd November 2018

Luckey Tor

Eagles Nest – Severe 4a – Lead
Original Route – Severe 4a -Lead

Sat on the ledge at the top of Eagles Nest, Pete and I reflected on what it means to be able to enjoy the opportunity for a bit of solitude and time away from the usual influences of everyday life. I know that there are people who go to extremes to capture moments like this, but here in our own backyard is a little bit of paradise.

What light!

It’s not good to gloat, but sometimes it’s so nice to realise that you’ve captured a moment in time which only you (and a few close mates) are privy to. Staring out across the canopy of trees towards the dart Pete and I, for a while, were the only people enjoying one of the most beautiful views in Devon (Dave and Tom were battling up an adjacent climb). It was also nice to be able to completely relax. Another thing our culture ensures is in in short supply.

Life Affirming

Enough of the eulogising. The walk in and out of Luckey Tor is nothing short of breathtaking. Moss covered boulders; twisted tree trunks and roots; a rock strewn river and an umbrella of trees accompanies you to a hidden gem of a crag. Tom and I had been here a few times before, but it was Dave and Petes first time. The video clip says it all!

The four of us concentrated on two severe’s for the day, but both were tough for the grade and also very good for the grade. Eagles Nest is all about the final ‘out there’ move through the V cleft, whereas Original Route has a gnarly traverse (poorly protected on the lead). They made for some real entertainment on this day.

Pete jammed in approaching the crux on Eagles Nest

Most importantly was the return of Pete, following his retirement. Great to have him along for the day. A real return to a fun day out. Dave and Tom seemed to have things wired as well, with two good leads. Got to love these Dartmoor sandbags πŸ™‚

My name is Riddell…… Jimmy Riddell

5th October 2018

Predannack Head

S.P.E.C.T.R.E. – eE1 – 5b Lead
Little Nellie – Severe – 4b Second
Astral Blue – Moderate – Solo

Quite a strange day really. This was a crag Dave and I had been meaning to explore for a while. Tom accompanied us on this trip making for a nice relaxed day at the crag.

Relocating

Little Nellie proved to be a tense start in a way, because the belay ledge (just enough for two as Tom stayed higher in the dry) was in imminent danger of being swamped by the tide. Dave kindly got a shifty on and saved me from a drenching, but only just.

I HOPE NO BIG WAVES COME???

To rewind a bit, the approach to LN is via an abseil off the top of the Octopussy Zawn left hand wall. Climb down to some perched boulders through an airy scramble and rig a belay on a slab resting against a big boulder. The its off into the unknown. Fortunately for us the swell was small because in anything but small conditions this climb would be impossible.

Its really about a series of strenuous opening moves and then its over. A bit lame really but the position of the climb makes it an adventure. Somewhat like S.P.E.C.T.R.E. This involves abseiling down to a sentry box and then climbing back up a crack line. It has its moments, with a few 5 b moves but in general I found it well protected and amenable. The top is strange in that the topo line would send you up the face making it bold. I could see a path through but the holds looked dodgy and unreliable. I ended up finishing up the crack as per the guidebook description, a more natural finish.

Tom, topsout on S.P.E.C.T.R.E

Now Astral Blue is just a jolly with a few spicy moves if done solo. The main event is the transition from the lower quartz crack to the upper groove. We took a highline, discovered by Tom and the more natural route, but exposed you to a pretty horrific fall if you blew it. There’s a delicate traverse across the v groove where the rock is a bit questionable and you need to have your wits about you.

Tom watching Dave on Astral Blue

As usual the team made for an amazing day in amongst the beautiful cornish coastline. It is amazing that we get to live in this fantastic county. How lucky are we! Again….

So… how many climbers do you know?

24th August 2018

Predannack Head – Pedn Clifton South

Bristletail Suicide – HS 4b – Second

The answer to that question is ‘not many’. Outside of our small circle of mates I am decidedly ‘climbing mate’s light’. My thoughts were stirred by a comment from another climber and his partner that we met (yes other people climb here too!) who reeled off a list of climbers having mistakenly been told by Tom that I was MIA qualified. I’m assuming these were all MIA’s, but I have no idea if this is the case. I suppose I was surprised at the assumption I would know who they were. Still having put them right that I am only RCI qualified they soon lost interest in me, but not before I was told that Kangaroo Crack was soft and there was no way Down Under, Up Top was VS.

To be fair this is probably true but I find I balk a little when a climb is described or referred to by its grade accuracy rather than its attributes. For example, whatever the grade, Kangaroo Crack is a great climb in a great location. I found the conversation had distinct undertones of the attitude that pervades surfing today, where bigger and gnarlier equates to better. My best sessions are actually when I’m relaxed and with my buddies. Size doesn’t matter. Still I’m probably guilty myself getting a bit ‘grade-ist’ at times. I think I just want to talk about how lucky we are to enjoy the amazing surroundings we climb in. Oh well…

The clouds of course toyed with us for the morning, with dark grey squalls dropping loads of rain either side of us until inevitably we caught one head on and the day was over. But we’d managed to traverse the boulder field (which is great fun) and get on Bristletail Suicide, a quality HS with a nice sting in the tail. Dave led, bagging some more lead time, following the groove crack with tricky but nice moves all the way. The final headwall can be done a number of different ways, but keep to the line and it proves a challenge. A good lead by Dave and good to have Tom with us again after his Scandinavian adventures.

The walk out helped me reflect on our encounter with the other climbers. I think we’re better off keeping to ourselves. We have too many ‘fruitloops’ in our team to be very sociable and tolerant (and I include myself in this).

Where East meets West

8th May 2018

Kilmar Tor

The Eastern Turret – Moderate

On occasions you get a certain light on the moors. Especially when the sun is out and low on the horizon. Things take on a washed out golden tinge and all the contrasts start to kick in. The effect is (to use an overused expression) magical. The moor becomes enchanted and Kilmar Tor in particular starts to look like a kind of fortress, with rock battlements and boulder castellations.

Perfect Light. Pity about the wind!

My bio compass was definitely haywire on this occasion. ‘Lets go to the Eastern Turret’ I said. That’s where the climbs are. Yes they are, but we went to the Western Turret. Doh! Anyway, as it happens and again, it was too windy to climb. The routes look good, but a 40 knot wind would have made them decidedly sketchy.

Loads of potential

So it became a bit of a bouldery walkathon, with a full circuit of the Tor and a couple of hand mashing boulder problems along the way. Even easy problems seem to be able to shred you on Bodmin Moor. I think I might tape my hands next time just to make the whole experience a bit more enjoyable.

Dave in action

The dead pony was macabre. Clearly it had been there a while and devoured by the critters in the rocks, but it makes you wonder what caused its death. Big cat?? Dont forget I know where the sheeps graveyard is in the woods in this area. Strange that.

Steady on Tom!

And so Dave, Tom and I headed back to the car as dusk came on. Wouldnt want to get caught out there in the dark……

Daves new hands

30th March 2018

Predannack Head (Lizard Point)

The Dunny – Severe 4a – Second (Tom Lead)

Sometimes you just have to hope and take a chance. The weather forecast was the same as usual (since we have been trapped in this global warming moisture bubble), sun, cloud, rain…. take your pick. For once this year we lucked a clear, bright sunny day.

Beautiful Predannack

The only issue was the swell. A booming south coaster which ended up putting paid to a lot of climbing at Predannack. But more importantly we got to mooch around and get our bearings which is not easy to do here. The main problem is finding that one feature to define your location. Here its the leaning Pinnacles. Once you find these you’re OK. Somehow we walked straight past them, but to be fair they are much easier to spot from the South than from the walk in from the North.

Sun at last and the remnants of the old Coastguard hut.

We overshot massively, ending up in a complex area of zawns and bluffs. In the end we checked the guide and found that the old Coastguard hut would be a good marker. Turns out that exactly where we were. Walking back everything becomes recognisable. Strange, but that’s the way it works πŸ™‚

The Dunny

We dropped down into Downunder Zawn which has loads of routes, although on this day because of the swell we opted to stay higher up and tackle a Severe. Its disconcerting when large waves crash underneath you as in the Zawn you are stood on top of a boulder field.

 

Tom led The Dunny, a tricky severe because of the rock quality in places. You can see how the rock is really sticky and good to climb on; but this comes with some looseness and unreliable holds. I think the main climbs further down look a lot more stable. On this route, it is the upper areas which suffer worst. Most importantly though, Dave got to test his grip after his operation on his elbows. It looks like the hands came up trumps as he cleaned the route with no problems.

After this we just spent the day wandering around scouting the various areas. With this info now stored I cant wait to get back and onto some of the really top looking routes.

 

A very sociable journey

13th to 19th March 2018

Leonidio/Kyparissi

And so ends an amazing week in Greece. Leonidio is a gem of a location; probably the best overall venue that we have been to on our travels so far for rock quality and atmosphere. It is a sleepy rural town that has stumbled upon climbing as a major revenue stream. As such its geared towards climbers and very welcoming. More on the crags here.

Just walls of rock πŸ™‚

We stayed at Leonidio ApartmentsΒ nestled below a major area of crags and within walking distance of a number of venues. Alexandra turned out to be the perfect host, turning up with cakes and pastries on regular occasions. Her sister ran the organic bakery down the road (Vlamis Wood Bakery) with a 100 year old oven and olive and tomato pasties that were gorgeous.

Chilling on the veranda

Leonidio is a very idyllic town. Quaint and full of Greek character and charm. What I particularly liked was the laid back atmosphere. All the locals out and about, eating, drinking and socialising. You dont tend to find this so much now, particularly in tourist areas, but Leonidio retains this aspect.

Main Street

We also lucked into meeting a great group of people who helped to make the trip even more enjoyable. When everyone is so friendly you cant help but have fun.